Archive for October, 2011

An historic Carnival touches many

Natatorium, part of O’ahu’s past.

There seems to be a lot of historic items this month, both old and some a little more recent, that have touched all of us is many ways.  We are going to touch them back by sharing them with others!

Things that have touched the past are always a good thing to revisit.

Karen talks about Touching the Past Kealiiokamalu Church where we can see the beauty of a country church.  Thank you for sharing this, Karen, we don’t hear about these country churches often enough.

Everyone knows how we always need someone to feed us at the Carnival! We have a great menu this month! It’s always touching to revisit old recipes (another touch from the past)!

heartland frugalista presents A Touch of the Islands: Recipe for Kalua Pig posted at Heartland Living on a Budget, saying, “A native of Honolulu, I moved to Wisconsin 11 years ago. I miss many things, especially the food. But I have learned how to make my beloved kalua pig!”  Makes my stomach growl just thinking about it.

Are you full? Not yet? Malia is going to share some other yummies!

Malia Yoshioka presents Comparing Shrimp Trucks on Oahu’s North Shore posted at WhyGo Hawaii, saying, “One of the most popular things to do on Oahu’s North Shore is to visit the shrimp trucks. We compared four in one day – Giovanni’s, Romy’s, Fumi’s, and Macky’s – in order to give a fair comparison.”

Giggles!  It’s always great to compare lunch wagons, and shrimp trucks should certainly be no exception!

Marquita (Marty) Herald tells us about Discovering a Sense of Place posted at IGG – tips, tools and tantalizing ideas.  Marty says, “The ‘Staycation’ trend may have been born as a result of economic issues, but we’ve since realized there are many other benefits of getting reacquainted with our neighborhoods … such as reconnecting with a sense of belonging to a community. In Hawaii, this feeling is known as ‘sense of place.'”

Thank you for joining us, Marty!  Mahalo for pointing out just how wonderful our own home towns are for all of us.  This post touched me!  It is amazing how many things you can discover while checking out your own backyard!

Jennifer Miner expresses some concern about a favorite backyard destination for locals and for our visitors, asking, What Will Happen to the Ihilani Resort and Spa?  This is being discussed over at The Vacation Gals – Family travel, girlfriend getaways, romantic getaways, destinations, things to do, travel tips.  I agree, Jennifer, that this might be a concern but Ihilani has already established a fine reputation and Aulani does not offer kama’aina rates (slightly reduced rates for locals) and that will be their biggest issue during the “off” season.

Disney did their research and has done all that is necessary to stay true to the culture of Hawai’i but they missed that very, very, fine detail! Ihilani Resort & Spa does offer kama’aina rates, by the way.  I called to be sure — most of the locals I know wouldn’t stay there if they didn’t!  Don’t worry, the novelty will wear off eventually and the real business battle will begin.  I’m just saying.

There is a lot more than famous mice and strange, lovable canines from Disney coming to our shores — fortunately or unfortunately.  Japan’s recent tsunami made history to be sure but this horrific event is about to touch us again.

Jan TenBruggencate brings us an intellectual fix when he tells us all about how a Russian ship finds UHawai`i-projected tsunami debris field.  Jan doesn’t know how I count on his wisdom over at Raising Islands — Hawai’i science and environment for some of my intellectual stimulus.  Hey, I can’t help it if I’m part nerd!  Alright, maybe more than part nerd.  I also can’t help it if I just love it when the University of Hawaii makes cool discoveries like this.  The bad part is, that this debris is apparently going to touch our shores a bit sooner than originally thought.  I wonder what that will do for the search for sea glass?

Since we really do need our cars for staycations and to travel a bit further to get to Ko ‘Olina (it’s really not that far!) and see Mickey, it would be a good thing to pay less for car insurance.

Tyler presents Hawaii Car Insurance | HI Car Insurance Quote Comparison posted at Car Insurance Comparison. Tyler said, “Even Hawaiians need car insurance!” I certainly cannot argue with that!

That concludes this chapter.  Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Aloha using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

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Life can be as fragile as glass

Sometimes you just need to do something mindless.  My girlfriend, Coco, suggested, well, actually coerced me into going to look for beach-worn fragments of glass.  She said, “it would be bloggable.”  I told her that was hitting below the belt!

This whole thing started when she posted a note on Facebook that said,

“Good and bad news: There has been a major decrease in littering off the shores of Hawaii. No more glass being thrown off shore or from boats. As a result, no matter how hard you look, there’s no more sea glass.” 

What is WRONG with her?!?

Coco was on the hunt for sea glass and another friend of hers told her about Sand Island. Sand Island?  Where the auto junkyards are?  No, where the ships have gone by and dropped their garbage and glass along with it.  Huh?  You can imagine where my mind went.  Ick!

Not too long after we spoke of broken glass and this blog-worthy adventure, when reality got a little bit too hard for me to handle, it was time to search for the simplicity of a unique and relatively-mindless distraction.  Few things provide that kind of distraction as well as the shores of O’ahu.

People enjoying the shore.

Of course the “icky” idea of things being discarded made me wonder if I needed to wear rubber boots but, on the contrary, the water was beautiful and very clean.  So don’t worry, no rubber boots required.

As we drove around trying to find this mystical repository of glittering sea glass, we stumbled on to this interesting looking place.

La Mariana sign.

I am sure I will investigate that one a bit more and talk about it later.  My blogger friend, Karen, has already discovered La Mariana and she has already shared it with her blog readers!

We were looking for glass.  We found the shore and we found some boats but we were still not quite where we needed to be.

US Coastguard ship.

I had to get a photo of this U.S. Coast Guard ship for a variety of reasons, not the least of which was my past inability to get a decent photo of these ships from Aloha Tower.

Still searching for this glass, we asked some people if they knew the spot we were looking for to see if they could help us with our search.  We did get one rather strange reply.  One gentleman said something like, “You mean where the haoles go looking for glass?”

Uh, excuse you?!?  This guy looked more like a tourist than anything else!  Coco and I must have both been wondering, “what the heck?”  At least he pointed us in the general direction.

Glass bottle on the grass.

Were we getting warmer?  This is not exactly the kind of glass we had in mind.  It just happened to be the first glass we found.

Coco searching for sea-worn glass.

We found it!  Our devoted search for pieces of sea glass is finally able to begin!  Now we will see what we can find along this interesting stretch of rocky beach.

What we actually found was even more interesting, even a bit freaky.

Concrete block molded into the rock.

Items were molded into the rock.  Stuck!  Somehow these things had become part of the shoreline.  I guess this peculiar process of fusing things together resembles the man-made reef idea, except it was not man-made.  We provided the materials and it seems that nature did the rest.

Broken glass molded into the rocks.

Some pieces of glass we attempted to collect were not to be removed. It looks like you can pick them up but they have become part of the rocks — you might be able to get a piece of them if you took a hammer and chisel to them but that would just not be right.  Besides, the edges would just be sharp again rather than worn by the sand and surf.

More glass joined with the rocks.

Hmmm, remember that quote posted above about the lack of glass being tossed into the ocean?  Apparently I failed to notice this additional comment from Coco’s friend, Lisa, who said, Oh yes! And due to the heat of decomposition, the glass is sometimes melted together! Have fun!

Man!  It seems that the “heat of decomposition” along with the heat of the sun have done a stellar job of melting everything together!

It is really amazing to see how the whole area has adapted to all of this and actually absorbed these things right into its little ecosystem.  In a fascinating way, this little area has taken in a strange culture of chemicals and embraced it as part of its own.  Sound familiar?  Are the islands not famous for doing the same thing with the cultures of people?  We absorb them and make them fit!  I could go “out there” with this idea!  I’m just saying.

There was more to discover here besides these pieces of glass, and other things we could not pick up.

Shore fishing on Sand Island.

So many people were enjoying this quiet little area.  There was even some fishing going on.  I would never have expected there to be people fishing here.  Well, why not?  Where there’s water, there’s fish!

Storm drain cover in an odd place.

I liked the look of this quiet little corner, except for the storm drain and that great big pipe.  These were certainly another unexpected curiosity.

Giant pipeline.

I will not wager any guesses or make any assumptions about why this is here or what it is for.  There is still no need for rubber boots so we can relax!

Another bottle left behind.

Oh no, not more of this kind of glass!  This bottle will probably get broken and become sea glass someday, but not anytime soon.  For now it is, shall we say, less than collectible, even without being stuck to the rocks!

Below is our collection!  There were a couple of shells that were interesting but the bulk of the collection was pieces of worn glass, no longer sharp and dangerous to touch. Some of these are, of course, molded together.

Collection of beach glass.

The pieces that could be removed from the rocks and/or sand were interesting, although not as colorful as I kept hoping for — I wanted more blue.  But, we did help to de-litter the beach just a bit!

My supposition is that the glass aficionados who use these interesting pieces of ocean art to create little table tops, etc., have already discovered this place so the pickings were slim for us.  Then again, there will be even less for them the next time they go!  It was a nice way to spend an afternoon.

View of Honolulu from Sand Island.

It was a beautiful day and I could not help but snap more shots.  I never get quite this vantage point from other venues.

Viewing Downtown Honolulu from Sand Island.

I did manage to get some otherwise impossible photos!  I do love my island.  Can you tell?  The island and its variety of ecosystems can often be as fragile as glass, but it can also be as tough as nails when it needs to be.

It was a bloody affair!

I got a little too up-close and personal with an associate whom I have been working closely with for many years.  After all this time I had become accustomed to walking all over this guy, but, with this affair, I shed blood, sweat, and tears all over Mr. Asphalt.

Slice above the eyebrow soon after it happened.

Already starting to bruise and the veins near the temple tell of the stress.

Cell phones, being what they are, don’t always take the best pictures but I was so freaked by the volume of blood (one spattered shirt, three paper towels and we are still dripping) I had to see what it looked like.  My mind kept thinking, “What is it that’s freaking people out?  Why is it still bleeding?”

They told me not to walk because of my bursitis.  Alright, I got it already!  This is what happens when you do not listen!  I could walk to Kaiser’s Honolulu clinic.  “No, bitch, you will not!”  (I’m mean to myself at times like this.)  Calling a cab will be cheap because it’s so close!  Duh!  It’s such a breeze to call 422-2222…  Pick me up!

Quick humor:  The first cab missed me, or he avoided me because, man did I look like a scary street person!  What cab driver wants to pick up a sweaty person all covered in blood?  I wouldn’t!

As I was waiting for the replacement cab, I was standing in the sun and shivering — uh, shock?  Not going to call the husband and have him yell at me!  I’ll just fix it.  Well, Kaiser will fix it.  Such lovely stitchery!

Mahalo to Kaiser’s Urgent Care on Pensacola Street for helping me “pull” things together!  Mahalo to The CAB for getting me there — even if I did look scary!

Bruised but nicely stitched.

Three days later I thought it would be fun to share the progress of my self-destruction.  I swear, women will stop at nothing to get a face lift!  I can laugh at it now but I have to admit to a bit of fear that, hopefully, will pass with a bit more time.  Pain will do that to a person.

It still shakes me up to walk by the area where this all happened.  I’m sure the memory will eventually numb with the rest of the whole incident.  In time.

The look after stitches have been removed.

It does seem to be taking forever for that bruise, aka black eye, to melt away.  I must say, those shades of green and brown are really not at all attractive.  As I’m writing this, about sixteen days later, my bruise is down to a sliver — still there but almost gone.  The impact was obviously much harder than I wanted to admit.  The fall started from a slightly elevated place before hitting the ground so I guess that’s to be expected.  Sigh.

Lessons to be learned: Walk softly, never take nature for granted, be sure to always carry a lot of paper towels, do not forget your cell phone, and for goodness sake, be careful with whom you decide to have an affair!